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From time to time on the Neurosurgery Blog, you will see us cross-posting or linking to items from other places when we believe they may interest our readers. Today, we wanted to bring attention to a recent publication in .​ The article — “” by Temitope O. Oshinowo, AB, et al. compares practice metrics and earning potential between female and male neurosurgeons and examines gender disparity in Medicare reimbursement.

The authors state that despite efforts to promote diversity within the neurosurgical workforce, individuals from underrepresented groups face significant challenges. Females account for approximately 50% of medical school graduates but comprise just 18.2% of neurosurgery residents and only 6% of board-certified neurosurgeons. Female physicians in the U.S. are estimated to be compensated 25% less, or the equivalent of $2 million, in career-long earnings.

Using Medicare data across practice settings, the authors examine patterns of significant disparity in procedural volume and payments and found significant gender-based variation in practice patterns and reimbursement among neurosurgeons serving the Medicare fee-for-service population. Female surgeons were reimbursed less than male surgeons for performing the same primary procedure. “While there has been a trend of increased female representation in neurosurgery, women continue to face challenges in establishing, maintaining, and progressing within their neurosurgical careers,” according to Oshinowo et al.

to read the full article.

We hope you will share what you learn from our posts. We invite you to join the conversation on Twitter by following @Neurosurgery and @WINSNeurosurge1 and using the hashtag #WomenInNeurosurgery.

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