WINS: Celebrating Women in Neurosurgery

By Career, Guest Post, Women in NeurosurgeryNo Comments

Gender diversity is not just good for women; it’s good for anyone who wants results.”

Melinda A. Gates

Modern neurosurgery recently crossed the century threshold as a medical discipline. The profession has a rich history, and women have played critical roles throughout the development of the specialty. The role of women in neurosurgery began with Louise Eisenhardt, MD, who was at the side of Harvey Cushing, MD, through much of his career. Ruth K. Jakoby, MD became the first woman diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgery in 1961. Later, Frances K. Conley, MD, achieved several ‘firsts’ as a woman in academic neurosurgery, culminating in a promotion to a full professorship at Stanford University in 1986. Read More

Cross-Post — Neurosurgery Publishes Updated Return-to-Play Recommendations for Collision Athletes After Cervical Spine Injury: A Modified Delphi Consensus Study With the Cervical Spine Research Society

By CNS Spotlight, Spine Care, TraumaNo Comments

From time to time on Neurosurgery Blog, you will see us cross-posting or linking to items from other places when we believe they hit the mark on an issue. We wanted to bring attention to these recommendations compiled by Alexander R. Vaccaro MD, PhD and Gregory D. Schroeder, MD and others at the Cervical Spine Research Society (CSRS) meeting in New York City. This article recently appeared in Neurosurgery, the official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, which publishes research on clinical and experimental neurosurgery covering the very latest developments in science, technology and medicine. Read More

Cross-Post — Neurosurgery Publishes Decompressive Craniectomy Update to the Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

By CNS Spotlight, Cross Post, TBI, Traumatic Brain InjuryNo Comments

From time to time on Neurosurgery Blog, you will see us cross-posting or linking to items from other places when we believe they hit the mark on an issue. Clinical guidelines have widespread impact and practical utility for practitioners. We want to bring attention to these updates, which recently appeared in Neurosurgery, the official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, which publishes research on clinical and experimental neurosurgery covering the very latest developments in science, technology and medicine. Read More

Physicians Suffer From Moral injury, Not Burnout

By Burnout, Guest Post, HealthNo Comments

Burnout has come to be defined as a workplace syndrome from chronic exposure to job-related stress. It is the constellation of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. More than half of physicians report at least one of these symptoms. The consequences of burnout are not just detrimental to physicians themselves, but also the people around them. Loss in productivity, high-risk behavior, disregard for safety procedures, more referrals, additional diagnostic tests and poor care are among the manifestations of physician burnout. Additionally, substance abuse, family breakups, poor health, depression and even suicide may also be extreme consequences of burnout. Burnout does not have to manifest by these catastrophic events; it can show up in small ways. Some of the subtler indicators of burnout include anger, aggression, nastiness, snide comments and disrespect for other physicians and health care professionals. Read More

Addressing Clinician Burnout is Essential to Achieving the Goal of Better Care

By BurnoutNo Comments

High rates of clinician burnout in the U.S. are detrimental to the quality of care being provided and harmful to individuals in the workforce. A report “Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being” by the National Academy of Medicine takes a systemic approach to address burnout that focuses on the structure, organization and culture of health care. Read More

Burnout Among Physicians: A System Issue

By BurnoutNo Comments

The prevalence of physician distress has been well documented in recent years, and data suggests that 44% of U.S. physicians experience symptoms of burnout.

A recent study titled, “Resilience and Burnout Among Physicians and the General US Working Population,” published in JAMA Network Open — a journal of the American Medical Association (AMA) — evaluated resilience among physicians and how it compared with resilience among other U.S. workers. The study also measured burnout symptoms to analyze the association between resilience and burnout among physicians. Read More